Theoretical Nanoelectronics

The quantum mechanical nature of matter is the basis of all functioning of electronic devices. We use techniques from many-body physics, from quantum statistical physics, and from the mathematics of topology, to analyze the properties of electrons in a wide range of present-day exploratory devices. Our work can enable the development of new qubits, and new approaches to building a quantum computer.

Head: Prof. Dr. David DiVincenzo

News and Events

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New method prevents quantum computers crash

Quantum information is fragile, which is why quantum computers must also be able to correct errors. But what if whole qubits are lost? Researchers at Forschungszentrum Jülich and RWTH Aachen University, in collaboration with Universities of Innsbruck and Bologna, are presenting a method in the journal Nature that allows quantum computers to keep going even if they lose some qubits along the way.

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PGI Colloquium: Prof. Dr. Mathias Kläui, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany

Antiferromagnetically ordered systems have previously been considered, as expressed by Louis Néel in his Nobel Prize Lecture, to be “interesting but useless”. However, as they potentially promise faster operation, enhanced stability, and higher integration, they could one day become a game changer for new spintronic devices.

Focus

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Electronic Properties of Nanostructured Materials

Atomic order-disorder transitions or phase transitions like freezing-melting are among the most dramatic effects occurring in condensed matter.

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Quantum Information Processing

We work at the fundamental level on the theory of quantum information processing, developing new concepts for qubits and multi-qubit modules.  We work closely with the experimental scientists in PGI-11.